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Remember what I wrote about it remaining to be seen if we dodged the “con-crud”? Well, forget all that. We came down with it as expected after all—which is why this missive from the second day wound up being more delayed than I would like.

Onward.

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Here I am in Day Two. I look terrible—there’s reasons for that which involve both a general lack of sleep and a surfeit of confusion.

1, 2, 3, 4, I Declare a Console War

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“War” is an easy metaphor often used to describe a given competition, and companies sometimes exploit our tendency to attach ourselves to tribal modes of thinking in order to move product. In the case of a few media companies in competition with one another, war isn’t a valid metaphor, it’s marketing for invented tribes.
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This job involves doing strange things. My wife and I have a combined total of more than 30 years of print design experience. That means we don't know everything. Someone always knows more, and on certain matters, like, for example, electronic games, our experience is lopsided: she simply has more experience when it comes to electronic games. She's also the better gamer.

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“War” is an easy metaphor often used to describe a given competition, and companies sometimes exploit our tendency to attach ourselves to tribal modes of thinking in order to move product.

In the case of a few media companies in competition with one another, war isn’t a valid metaphor, it’s marketing for invented tribes.

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Ah, the Vectrex. An utterly unique console.

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This blog is now a tool reference.

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Previously on Game Restart: [it’s a series]

N-game.

Because of the Wavebird, games which were released for every platform of that generation wound up being purchased just for the GameCube. Wireless was a pretty big deal, especially since the new CRT television didn’t require me to sit so close to the display in order to play. Besides, then you get to use the Wavebird.

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Previously on Game Restart: [it’s a series]

The thing about arcades is that arcades are expensive

Adjusted for inflation, a quarter in early 80s money is approximately 63¢ in today’s money at the time of this writing. Most people probably aren’t used to spending money after the initial investment in the console and then the game for their home, but imagine spending that for every three tries, lives, or continues.

Moldvay D&D Basic Rules
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“Failure” is often used as a dirty word by gamers, but this is one of the ways in which gamer culture often gets things wrong. If you fail and try again, that’s essentially practice for success.

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Previously on Game Restart:
1 of N [recapping later days, but still pretty early]
0 of N [recapping the early days]

In each of the recaps, you may have noticed I haven’t mentioned Nintendo.

Because of the PlayStation, I have Nintendo. (And pretty much only because of Sony.)

That may require unpacking a bit. Back to 1985.

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Previously on Game Restart: [recapping intensifies]

I’m not going to suggest that video games were better in the olden days. They absolutely were not; anyone who thinks that they were is probably legally blind or has closed their mind to reality not damaged by Space War for the Atari VCS. At a certain point, video games didn’t exist. And then once they existed, they were objectively terrible for the most part. Being novel was their only saving grace. 

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We didn’t have much money. I understand that now, though I didn’t understand it then. 

This meant toys of an electronic nature—especially in the 1970s—were rare, and although I still recall we had a lot of toys, even limited lots of toys like Lego, Micronauts, and some Star Wars figures and (hand-made) vehicles, electrical devices were rare.

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