Monster Brains

Monster Brains Turns 14!

Matt Furie - Monster Brains Logo 1Matt Furie

Monster Brains was created 14 years ago on January 23rd, 2006.  I have many great posts planned for 2020 and beyond. If you've enjoyed what I've contributed to Monster Brains over the nearly decade and a half, please consider donating to the site.

Any donation from you makes it easier for me to continue finding and sharing amazing and obscure art related to the field of monsters at Monster Brains!


MONSTER BRAINS LOGO - Aleksandra WaliszewskaAleksandra Waliszewska

MONSTER BRAINS LOGO - Johnny RyanJohnny Ryan

MONSTER BRAINS LOGO - John Kenn MortensenJohn Kenn Mortensen

MONSTER BRAINS LOGO - Trevor HendersonTrevor Henderson

MONSTER BRAINS LOGO - Fufu FrauenwahlFufu Frauenwahl

MONSTER BRAINS LOGO - Marcus ShaferMarcus Schäfer

MONSTER BRAINS LOGO - Dieter VDODieter Van der Ougstraete

MONSTER BRAINS LOGO - Michael SkattumMichael Skattum

Sean Aaberg - Monster BrainsSean Aaberg

Charles Altamont Doyle (1832 – 1893)

Charles Altamont Doyle - TemptationTemptation

Charles Altamont Doyle - Meditation, Self Portrait, 1885-93Meditation, Self Portrait, 1885-93

Charles Altamont Doyle - The seat of fairies is not always enviable. The seat of fairies is not always enviable

Charles Altamont Doyle - The Spirits of the Prisoners, 1885The Spirits of the Prisoners, 1885

Charles Altamont Doyle - The Spirits of the Prisoners, second versionThe Spirits of the Prisoners, second version

Charles Altamont Doyle - A Dance around the MoonA Dance around the Moon

Charles Altamont Doyle - Drawing from "The Doyle Diary" 1889 (1) Drawing from "The Doyle Diary" 1889

Charles Altamont Doyle - Saint Giles, His BellsSaint Giles, His Bells

Charles Altamont Doyle - PloughingPloughing

Charles Altamont Doyle - Nemo Me Impune Lacessit as the Frog Said Beyond the ThistleNemo Me Impune Lacessit as the Frog Said Beyond the Thistle

Charles Altamont Doyle - Illustration for Goethe's Faust, WalpurgisnachtIllustration for Goethe's Faust, Walpurgisnacht

Charles Altamont Doyle - Fairy folk celebrating around the ploughFairy Folk Celebrating Around the Plough

Charles Atamont Doyle  - The pianistThe Pianist

Charles Altamont Doyle - The Unseen AudienceThe Unseen Audience

Charles Altamont Doyle - Drawing from "The Doyle Diary" 1889 (2)Painting from "The Doyle Diary" 1889

Charles Altamont Doyle - Drawing from "The Doyle Diary" 1889 (3) Painting from "The Doyle Diary" 1889

Charles Altamont Doyle - Please don't tell the singing birdsPlease don't tell the singing birds

Charles Altamont Doyle - Scare CrowScare Crow

Charles Altamont Doyle - Dancing Fairies, 1850Dancing Fairies, 1850

After Charles Altamont Doyle - The Mummelsee, and the Water-MaidensAfter Charles Altamont Doyle - The Mummelsee, and the Water-Maidens

Charles Altamont Doyle - FairiesFairies

'''Charles Altamont Doyle was born on 25th March 1832. Today he is mainly remembered for being the father of Scottish writer Arthur Conan Doyle, the creator of Sherlock Holmes. However, Charles Altamont Doyle was a talented illustrator and watercolourist. He was the son of Irish artist John Doyle, the political cartoonist known by the pen name as H.B., and Marianna Conan Doyle. Charles Altamont Doyle moved to Edinburgh in 1849, where he worked as an assistant surveyor at the Scottish Office of Work. It was in Edinburgh that he married Mary Foley and they went on to have several children including Arthur Conan Doyle.

 In addition to his full-time employment he produced illustrations for a number of books, including for the Our Trip to Blunderland (1877) by Lewis Carroll, as well as designs for a number of journals. He also exhibited at the Scottish Royal Academy. His paintings, were often of fantasy scenes, many featuring fairies. He suffered with severe bouts of depression and alcoholism. As his condition worsened his work became darker and more sinister. Concerns about his heavy drinking and impact on his mental health led to his dismisal from his job in 1876, although he did receive a pension. Five years later, after growing family worries about his moods and desperate attempts to obtain alcohol, he was admitted to the nursing home of Blairerno House at Drumlithie in the Mearns. At times he still managed to obtain alcohol and there were incidents of disturbing behaviour. Following an aggressive attempt to leave Blairerno House he was sent to Sunnyside, Montrose Royal Lunatic Asylum on 26 May 1885.

 His bouts of depression worsened at Sunnyside and he began experiencing epileptic seizures. The effects of long term drinking had negative effects on his memory and mental health. It is described that he would tell staff that he was receiving messages from the unseen world and accused them of being devils. Nevertheless, he continued to paint and did experience calmer periods. In 1888 he completed illustrations for an edition of his son's first Sherlock Holmes novel A Study in Scarlet. His work over the period that he remained at the asylum often combined fantastical images of animals with other imaginary creatures. He maintained to his family that he was sane and had been wrongfully confined. In doing so he complied sketchbooks with caricatures, drawings of fairies and notes. He inscribed the frontispiece of his sketchbook diary: ‘Keep steadily in view that this Book is ascribed wholly to the produce of a MADMAN. Whereabouts would you say was the deficiency of Intellect? or depraved taste? If in the whole book you can find a single evidence of either, mark it and record it against me.’ 

In January 1891 he was transferred to Edinburgh Royal Infirmary and died in the Crichton Royal Institution in Dumfries on 10th October 1893. Arthur Conan Doyle remembered his father with fondness. In his autobiography he wrote ".. full of the tragedy of unfulfilled powers and of underdeveloped gifts. He had his weaknesses, as all of us have ours, but he had also some very remarkable and outstanding virtues. A tall man, long-bearded, and elegant, he had a charm of manner and a courtesy of bearing which I have seldom seen equalled. His wit was quick and playful. He possessed, also, a remarkable delicacy of mind which would give him moral courage enough to rise and leave any company which talked in a manner which was coarse…" Arthur Conan Doyle mounted an exhibition of his father's works in 1924 at the Brook Galleries in London, which were praised by Irish playwright and 1925 Nobel Prize in Literature winner George Bernard Shaw.

 The Doyle Diary, containing a facsimile of works from a sketchbook he created from March to July 1889 while at Sunnyside, Montrose Royal Lunatic Asylum, was published in 1978, bringing his work to a wider audience and gaining the artist greater appreciation. One of his paintings ‘The Spirits of the Prisoners,’ is now in Australia. It is described in a description by the Art Gallery of New South Wales: " 'The spirits of the prisoners' is a phantasmagoric scene with fairies, imps and animals cascading over the rooftop of Montrose Asylum and down its dark, brooding walls. It reveals with such surreal clarity the painter’s disturbed or joyful visions of the spirit world, here surveyed by the bearded apparition in the clouds – a clearly identifiable portrait of the artist himself, shows those creatures swooping and circling around the asylum." ''' - quote source

Image sources include Lyon and TurnbullWellcome Collection and Christies.

Charles Altamont Doyle was previously mentioned here in 2009.

The Master of the Fertility of the Egg, 17th-18th Century

The Master of the Fertility of the Egg - Grotesque Scenes, 17th Century

Master of the Fertility of the Egg - Grotesque Scene With Animals, Late 17th- early 18th Century

Master of the Fertility of the Egg - Opera Nova Curiosa,  1695Opera Nova Curiosa,  1695

Master of the Fertility of the Egg - A Concert Of Animals, Birds and Stylised Figures, Late 17th - Early 18th Century

The Master of the Fertility of the Egg - Animal and Stylized Figure Scene 2, 17th Century

The Master of the Fertility of the Egg - Animal and Stylized Figure Scene 4, 17th Century

The Master of the Fertility of the Egg - Animal and Stylized Figure Scene 3, 17th Century

The Master of the Fertility of the Egg - Animal and Stylized Figure Scene 6, 17th Century

The Master of the Fertility of the Egg - At the Cobbler’s, 17th CenturyAt the Cobbler’s

The Master of the Fertility of the Egg - Animal and Stylized Figure Scene 8, 17th Century

The Master of the Fertility of the Egg - Animal and Stylized Figure Scene 7, 17th Century

The Master of the Fertility of the Egg - At the Wigmakers, 17th CenturyAt the Wigmakers

The Master of the Fertility of the Egg - Animal and Stylized Figure Scene 9, 17th Century

The Master of the Fertility of the Egg - Animal and Stylized Figure Scene 5, 17th Century

The Master of the Fertility of the Egg - The Banquet of Diogenes, 17th CenturyThe Banquet of Diogenes

The Master of the Fertility of the Egg - Animal and Stylized Figure Scene 1, 17th Century

The Master of the Fertility of the Egg - The Discourse of Diogenes, 17th CenturyThe Discourse of Diogenes

The Master of the Fertility of the Egg - Watermelon Regatta, 17th CenturyWatermelon Regatta

The Master of the Fertility of the Egg - Watermelon Regatta, detail, 17th CenturyWatermelon Regatta, detail


"Maestro della Fertilità dell'Uovo or Master of the Fertility of the Egg is the name given to a yet to be identified painter active in the second half of the 17th and early 18th century in Brescia. The name is based on a work entitled La fertilità dell' Uovo (The Fertility of the Egg), which depicts dwarfs, geese and lobsters hatching eggs and is in the collection of the Milwaukee Art Museum.

 The art historian Mariolina Olivera was the first to isolate a group of works by this master in her 1990 monograph Faustino Bocchi e l'arte di figurar pigmei. She placed the master in the circle of Faustino Bocchi, an artist active in Brescia around the same time and known for his genre paintings with dwarfs. The master’s oeuvre distinguishes itself from Bocchi’s more dreamlike work through its biting, satirical edge.

 The identity of the Master of the Fertility of the Egg has yet to be determined. Some art historians have suggested he was Bernardino Dehò (1675-1717) from Cremona while others have pointed at Angelo Esseradts, known as ‘il Fiammingo’ (the Fleming), whose name was also Italianised as Everardi. Everardi was Bocchi’s teacher and introduced the bizarre and grotesque elements of Flemish art to Brescia.

 The works of this master typically depict grotesque figures (usually dwarfs) and animals engaging in various human activities. The works generally ignore space and are characterized by strong foreshortening. The figures are often portrayed in profile and stand out against the dark, mostly flat backgrounds. This gives them the impression of being cut out. The persons and animals in the compositions engage in disorganised actions and reactions. The compositions are full of absurd and grotesque elements and it is often difficult to make out what exactly is going on. The master’s raucous style appears to constitute some form of 'moral zoology'. The absurd characters are possibly intended to show the madness of the human condition, and the vanity and ridiculousness of life." - quote source

Artist previously shared here.

Heinrich Kley (1863 - 1945)

Heinrich Kley - Die "Krupp'schen Teufel" von Heinrich Kley sind nicht böse

Heinrich Kley - Walpurgisnacht, 1923

Heinrich Kley - Der Fund im Winterwalde (discovery in wintry forest), Vol. 17, Jugend, No. 52, p.1597, full page of the ‘Weihnachts-Nummer’ – Christmas Special, December 21.

Heinrich Kley - In the Witch's Kitchen, 1923

Heinrich Kley - 03

Heinrich Kley - 07

Heinrich Kley - Sea Monster, 1920

Heinrich Kley - Cover design ‘Antiker Faschingsumzug nach München’ (classical carnival procession to Munich), Vol. 15, Jugend, No. 5, p.97, of the Carnival Special, January 29.

Heinrich Kley - Demons Pulling People into the Jaws of Hell, 1910-15

Heinrich Kley - Skurrile Idee

Heinrich Kley - The Race, 1940

Heinrich Kley - Bacchanalian Procession

Heinrich Kley - 08

Heinrich Kley - Nymphe und Wassermann.

Heinrich Kley - 01

Heinrich Kley - Reiter mit Fabelwesen

Heinrich Kley - Caught, 1910

Heinrich Kley - Tempting Satan

Heinrich Kley - 02

Heinrich Kley - Die Dompteuse, 1910

Heinrich Kley - Der Orchideengarten - 1920, Heinrich Kley - Elektrodamonen

Heinrich Kley - Der Orchideengarten - 1920, Heinrich Kley - Der Schlangenbeschworer

AKG894817

Heinrich Kley - 10s

Heinrich Kley - 11

Heinrich Kley - High-Speed Printing Press, 1910

Heinrich Kley - 12.s

Heinrich Kley - Der Orchideengarten - 1919, Heinrich Kley, illustration - A Man and a Woman Examining Orchids which Grow from a Skull, 1920

Heinrich Kley - 13

Heinrich Kley - The Traveller on a Pleasure Trip, 1910

Heinrich Kley - 04

Heinrich Kley - At a Seaside Resort, 1910

Heinrich Kley -  A Hot Evening Meal, 1910

Heinrich Kley - Daemonic Derailment, 1909

Heinrich Kley - Satyrs and Centaurs

Heinrich Kley - 05

Heinrich Kley - 06

Heinrich Kley - Witch Sketch

Heinrich Kley - Anthill

Heinrich Kley - The Airship

Heinrich Kley - Like Cures Like

Heinrich Kley - Sabotage

Heinrich Kley - 16

Heinrich Kley - 14

Heinrich Kley - 15

Heinrich Kley - Recruits

Heinrich Kley - Parlor Game

Heinrich Kley - Moving Day

Heinrich Kley - Solitude in the Royal Prussian Forest

Heinrich Kley - Accordion

Heinrich Kley - Doctor of Engineering

Heinrich Kley - The Caterpillar's Meal

Heinrich Kley - Away from Rome!

Heinrich Kley - 17

Heinrich Kley - A Game of Diabolerina

Heinrich Kley - Human Shish Kebab

"Kley studied "practical arts" at the Karlsruhe Akademie and finished his studies in Munich.[1] His early works were conventional portraits, landscapes, still lifes, city scenes and historical paintings. From about 1892 he won a reputation as an "industry artist", painting manufacturing scenes in oils and watercolors. They proved his deep understanding of the modern machine world. Kley attained greater notoriety with his sometimes darkly humorous pen drawings, published in Jugend and the notorious Simplicissimus.

The date of Kley's death is uncertain. Rumors initially suggested his demise in the early 1940s. It is also suggested that Kley died on August 2, 1945. Some sources mention the time of death on February 8, 1952.

Cartoonist Joe Grant was well aware of Kley's work and introduced his drawings to Walt Disney, who built an extensive private collection. A number of early Disney productions, notably Fantasia, reveal Kley's inspiration.

Due to Disney's interest and reprints by Dover Publications, Kley is still known in the USA, while he is nowadays little regarded in Germany." - quote source

Ulf Rahmberg

Ulf Rahmberg - Painting No. 21 (side A), 1970-73Painting No. 21 (side A), 1970-73

Ulf Rahmberg - Painting No. 21 (side B), 1970-73 (second photo)Painting No. 21 (side B), 1970-73

Ulf Rahmberg - Painting No. 21 (side B), 1970-73Painting No. 21 (side B), 1970-73

Ulf Rahmberg - Grabado #18, 1973Grabado #18, 1973

Ulf Rahmberg - Gears, 1960Gears, 1960
 Ulf Rahmberg -  Title Unknown, 1979Title Unknown, 1979
 Ulf Rahmberg - Flintskallig, 1994Flintskallig, 1994
 Ulf Rahmberg - Joint EngineeringJoint Engineering
 Ulf Rahmberg - Title Unknown, 1979Title Unknown, 1979 Painting 1923, 1960

 Ulf Rahmberg - Title Unknown, 1961Title Unknown, 1961
 Ulf Rahmberg - On the battle front, nothing new, 1990-91On the battle front, nothing new, 1990-91
 Ulf Rahmberg - Kroppsväcktaren,  1984Kroppsväcktaren, 1984
 Ulf Rahmberg - KapitoleumKapitoleum

Ulf Rahmberg - SnovitSnovit

Ulf Rahmberg - Sketch for 34 o'clockSketch for 34 o'clock

Ulf Rahmberg - Sketch for painting no 26Sketch for painting no 26
 Ulf Rahmberg - MussepiggpartietMussepiggpartiet
 Ulf Rahmberg - Untitled sketchUntitled sketch
 Ulf Rahmberg - Title Unknown, 1991Title Unknown, 1991
 Ulf Rahmberg - Etching No. 14, 1966Etching No. 14, 1966

Ulf Rahmberg - Sketch for painting 34Sketch for painting 34

Ulf Rahmberg - Untitled 1 Ulf Rahmberg - Untitled 2 Ulf Rahmberg - Untitled 3 Ulf Rahmberg - Sexual Motifs 3Sexual Motifs 3

Ulf Rahmberg - Sexual Motifs 2Sexual Motifs 2
 Ulf Rahmberg - Sexual Motifs 1Sexual Motifs 1

Ulf Rahmberg - Sexual Motifs 4 (detail) Ulf Rahmberg - Sexual Motifs 4Sexual Motifs 4" See more at Rahmberg's website.

Harry Clarke (1889 - 1931)

Harry Clarke illustrated Edgar Allan Edgar Allan Poe's Tales of Mystery and Imagination, from George Harrap & Co. Publishing, London, 1923.Interior art for Edgar Allan Poe's "Tales of Mystery and Imagination"  (1936)

Harry Clarke - "Say, rather, the rending of her coffin." Interior art for Edgar Allan Poe's Tale "The Fall of the House of Usher." ,1936"Say, rather, the rending of her coffin." Interior art for Edgar Allan Poe's Tale "The Fall of the House of Usher." (1936)

Harry Clarke - "It was the most noisome quarter of London." Illustration from Edgar Allan Poe's Tale "The Man of the Crowd", 1936"It was the most noisome quarter of London." Illustration from Edgar Allan Poe's Tale "The Man of the Crowd"(1936)

"He shrieked once, once only." Art by Harry Clarke for Poe's "Tales of Mystery & Imagination" (1936)"He shrieked once, once only." Art for Poe's "Tales of Mystery & Imagination" (1936)

"An attachment which seemed to attain new strength." Art by Harry Clarke for Poe's Tale "Metzengerstein" (1936)"An attachment which seemed to attain new strength." Art for Poe's Tale "Metzengerstein" (1936)

"Gnashing its teeth and flashing fire from its eyes, it flew upon the body of the girl." Art by Harry Clarke for Poe's "The Murders in the Rue Morgue" (1936)"Gnashing its teeth and flashing fire from its eyes, it flew upon the body of the girl." Art for Poe's "The Murders in the Rue Morgue" (1936)

"The dagger dropped gleaming upon the sable carpet." Art by Harry Clarke for Poe's "The Pit and the Pendulum" (1936)"The dagger dropped gleaming upon the sable carpet." Art for Poe's "The Pit and the Pendulum" (1936)

"I had walled the monster up within the tomb!"  Art by Harry Clarke for Poe's "The Black Cat" (1936)"I had walled the monster up within the tomb!"  Art for Poe's "The Black Cat" (1936)

"It was a fearful page in the record of my existence." Art by Harry Clarke for Poe's Tale "Berenice." (1936)"It was a fearful page in the record of my existence." Art for Poe's Tale "Berenice." (1936)

"But, for many minutes, the heart beat on with a muffled sound." Art by Harry Clarke for Poe's "The Tell-Tale Heart" (1936)"But, for many minutes, the heart beat on with a muffled sound." Art  for Poe's "The Tell-Tale Heart" (1936)

 "They swarmed upon me in ever-accumulating heaps." Art by Harry Clarke for Poe's "The Pit and the Pendulum" (1936)"They swarmed upon me in ever-accumulating heaps." Art for Poe's "The Pit and the Pendulum" (1936)

Harry Clarke - Art for Edgar Allan Poe's "Fall of the House of Usher", 1936Edgar Allan Poe's "Fall of the House of Usher", 1936

Harry Clarke  - "Deep, deep, and forever, into some ordinary and nameless grave." Art for Edgar Allan Poe's "The Premature Burial", 1936"Deep, deep, and forever, into some ordinary and nameless grave." Art for Edgar Allan Poe's "The Premature Burial", 1936


Harry Clarke - Art for Edgar Allan Poe's "Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar" 1936Edgar Allan Poe's "Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar" 1936

Harry Clarke  - Art for Edgar Allan Poe's "King's Pest", 1936Edgar Allan Poe's "King's Pest", 1936

Harry Clarke - "Methinks, a million fools in choir are raving and will never tire." interior art for Goethe's Faust, 1927"Methinks, a million fools in choir are raving and will never tire." interior art for Goethe's Faust, 1927

 "Drest thus, I seem a different creature!" Art by Harry Clarke for Goethe's Faust (1927)Margaret: "Drest thus, I seem a different creature!" Art for Goethe's Faust, 1927

 "Is there anything in my poor power to serve you?" Art by Harry Clarke for Goethe's Faust (1927)Mephistopheles: "Is there anything in my poor power to serve you?" Art for Goethe's Faust, 1927

 "Clustering grapes invite the hand." Art by Harry Clarke for Goethe's Faust (1927)Siebel: "Clustering grapes invite the hand." Art for Goethe's Faust, 1927

 "Come - she is judged!" Art by Harry Clarke for Goethe's Faust (1927)Mephistopheles: "Come - she is judged!" Art for Goethe's Faust, 1927

 "Forward! forward! faster! faster!" Art by Harry Clarke for Goethe's Faust (1927)Mephistopheles: "Forward! forward! faster! faster!" Art for Goethe's Faust, 1927

Harry Clarke - Illustration for Faust, 1925Illustration for Faust, 1925

Harry Clarke - Fifth decoration in "Faust" by Goethe, 1925
 Decoration in "Faust" by Goethe, 1925

 "Does not death lurk without?" Art by Harry Clarke for Goethe's Faust (1927)Margaret: "Does not death lurk without?" Art by Harry Clarke for Goethe's Faust (1927)

 "On a road like this men droop and drivel, while woman goes fearless and fast to the devil." Art by Harry Clarke for Goethe's Faust (1927)Wizards and Warlocks: "On a road like this men droop and drivel, while woman goes fearless and fast to the devil." Art by Harry Clarke for Goethe's Faust (1927)

Tailpiece by Harry Clarke for Goethe's Faust (1927). Signed, Limited American EditionTailpiece for Goethe's Faust (1927). Signed, Limited American Edition

 in this enchanted glass" interior art for Goethe's Faust, 1927"How heavenly Fair the Form that shines: in this enchanted glass" interior art for Goethe's Faust, 1927

Harry Clarke - I'LL FLY FROM THIS PLACE, WITH ONE BOUND, TO HELL, OR ANYWHERE, TO LEAVE 'EM, 1935
"I'll fly from this place, with one bound, to hell, or anywhere, to leave 'em." 1935

Harry Clarke - "Let him have his head cut off!"From "The Traveling Companion" from Hans Christian Andersen's Fairy Tales, 1916 "Let him have his head cut off!"From "The Traveling Companion" from Hans Christian Andersen's Fairy Tales, 1916

Harry Clarke - “‘I know what you want,’ said the sea witch." Illustration from "The Little Sea Maid," Fairy Tales by Hans Christian Andersen, 1916“‘I know what you want,’ said the sea witch." Illustration from "The Little Sea Maid," Fairy Tales by Hans Christian Andersen, 1916

Harry Clarke - "How do you manage to come on the great rolling river?"From "The Snow Queen" from Hans Christian Andersen's Fairy Tales, 1916"How do you manage to come on the great rolling river?"From "The Snow Queen" from Hans Christian Andersen's Fairy Tales, 1916

Harry Clarke - "'Music! Music!' cried the Emperor. 'You little precious golden bird, sing!'" From "The Nightingale" from Hans Christian Andersen's Fairy Tales, 1916"'Music! Music!' cried the Emperor. 'You little precious golden bird, sing!'" From "The Nightingale" from Hans Christian Andersen's Fairy Tales, 1916

Harry Clarke - "'But how will I find the money?' asked the soldier."From "The Tinder Box," from Hans Christian Andersen's Fairy Tales, 1916"'But how will I find the money?' asked the soldier."From "The Tinder Box," from Hans Christian Andersen's Fairy Tales, 1916

Harry Clarke - "'Don't give yourself airs,' said the old man."From "The Elf Hill" from Hans Christian Andersen's Fairy Tales, 1916"'Don't give yourself airs,' said the old man."From "The Elf Hill" from Hans Christian Andersen's Fairy Tales, 1916

Harry Clarke - SilenceSilence

Harry Clarke – Illustration from Selected Poems of Charles Swinburne, 1928Illustration from Selected Poems of Charles Swinburne, 1928

Art for the Poem "The Leper" by Harry Clarke in "Selected Poems of Algernon Charles Swinburne" (1928)Art for the Poem "The Leper" by Harry Clarke in "Selected Poems of Algernon Charles Swinburne" (1928)

Art for the Poem "Faustine" by Harry Clarke in "Selected Poems of Algernon Charles Swinburne" (1928)Art for the Poem "Faustine" by Harry Clarke in "Selected Poems of Algernon Charles Swinburne" (1928)

Harry Clarke - "The Last Hour of the Night,"  illustration for Dublin of the Future, 1922"The Last Hour of the Night,"  illustration for Dublin of the Future, 1922

Harry Clark - Judith slaying Holofernes, early 20th CJudith slaying Holofernes, early 20th C

Harry Clarke - Mephistopheles, for "Faust" by Goethe, 1925Harry Clarke - Mephistopheles, for "Faust" by Goethe, 1925

Harry Clarke - Mephistopheles

Harry Clarke - Decoration in Faust by Goethe, 1925Decoration in "Faust" by Goethe, 1925

Harry Clarke - Second decoration in Faust by Goethe, 1925Decoration in "Faust" by Goethe, 1925

Harry Clarke - Third decoration in "Faust" by Goethe, 1925Decoration in "Faust" by Goethe, 1925

Harry Clarke - Fourth decoration in "Faust" by Goethe, 1925Decoration in "Faust" by Goethe, 1925

Harry Clarke - Sixth decoration in "Faust" by Goethe, 1925Decoration in "Faust" by Goethe, 1925

Harry Clarke - Second Interior art from Edgar Allan Poe's "Tales of Mystery and Imagination" 1923Interior art from Edgar Allan Poe's "Tales of Mystery and Imagination" 1923

Harry Clarke - Interior art from Edgar Allan Poe's "Tales of Mystery and Imagination" 1923Interior art from Edgar Allan Poe's "Tales of Mystery and Imagination" 1923

Harry Clarke – 2nd interior decoration from Selected Poems of Charles Swinburne, 1928Interior decoration from Selected Poems of Charles Swinburne, 1928

Harry Clarke – Interior decoration from Selected Poems of Charles Swinburne, 1928Interior decoration from Selected Poems of Charles Swinburne, 1928


A brief biography of the artist can be found at Wikipedia. 

Fritz Aigner (1930 - 2005)

Fritz Aigner - Illustration from "The Beauty and the Beast", 1970Illustration from "The Beauty and the Beast", 1970

Fritz Aigner - What I wanted to say ... with self-expression, 1970 What I wanted to say ... with self-expression, 1970

Fritz Aigner - Figures, 1970Figures, 1970

Fritz Aigner - Frog King - from "The Beauty and the Beast" seriesFrog King - from "The Beauty and the Beast" series

Fritz Aigner - Title Unknown

Fritz Aigner - Untitled, 1971Untitled, 1971

Fritz Aigner - Second illustration from "The Beauty and the Beast", 1970Second illustration from "The Beauty and the Beast", 1970

Fritz Aigner

Fritz Aigner - illustration from "The Beauty and the Beast", 1995 From Series "The Beauty and the Beast", 1995

Fritz Aigner - Erotic Representations Erotic Representations

Fritz Aigner - The Big Fight, 1979The Big Fight, 1979

Most artworks found at Dorotheum.

Pages